Q and A

You’ve got questions, we’ve got answers. Have a look around and do tell if you have a question that’s missing—we love helping you get smarter: info@owntruhomes.com


Are modular homes, mobile homes and manufactured homes all the same thing?

Yes and no. TRU Homes may be described by consumers as mobile homes, modular homes or manufactured homes—but manufactured homes is the most accurate description. What’s the difference? Mostly newer construction and safety regulations that guide how all TRU Homes are made:

“The federal Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards (better known as the HUD Code) are a stringent series of construction and safety standards and regulations that ensure that manufactured homes are superior to mobile homes. The name “mobile homes” refers to homes built before 1976, when the HUD code was implemented. Since then they have been called manufactured homes, constructed in a controlled factory environment and built to the HUD Code. These federal standards regulate manufactured housing design and construction, strength and durability, transportability, fire resistance, energy efficiency and quality.”1

1 “Manufactured Homes are as Safe as Traditional Homes During a Storm”, https://globenewswire.com/news-release/2016/08/30/868126/0/en/Manufactured-Homes-are-as-Safe-as-Traditional-Homes-During-a-Storm.html


To buy a TRU Home, should I own land or have land secured first?

Yes, you will need to own or have a signed lease for the land where your TRU Home will be placed. If you own land, during the home purchase process, you will need to provide both your land deed and a plot map if a plot map is available. If you are leasing land through a mobile home community, proof of your agreement may be required before we can deliver your home. If you are looking to lease or buy a TRU Home within an established mobile home community where there are currently mobile homes for sale, proof of land ownership is not necessary.


How and where can I tour a TRU Home in-person?

Many TRU Home retailers across the country would happily give you a tour. Using our retailer locator tool, find the one closest to you and give them a call (or request an appointment online) and you’ll be one step closer: Start here.


May I see the TRU Home building process at a home building facility?

We admire your curiosity. Our homes are built in facilities located in Tennessee, Alabama and Texas. If you live nearby or will be driving through, you’re more than welcome to join a tour. Sign up here for the home building facility closest to you:


Who do I call if there’s an issue with my TRU Home?

Great question. For starters, gather all the possible information you can about the known issue (owner’s manuals, dates of incidents, etc.), then reach out to the retailer where you bought your TRU Home. They’ll point you in the direction of someone who can help get your home back to 100% as fast as possible.


How do I know which TRU Home is right for me?

It’s a tough choice. The most important considerations are the size of your family / number of people living in the home and, of course, your budget. The bigger the home, the more it costs. But you’ll also want to make sure there’s enough space for you and/or your family to grow into, so that your investment pays off for years to come and you don’t outgrow your space. One of our retailers would be happy to help talk you through the decision and make some recommendations based on your family size, budget and housing goals for the coming years.


How do I purchase a TRU Home?

Good news: It’s pretty simple. First, start by identifying the home or homes you’re seriously considering by looking around online and visiting one of our retailers. Then, connect with one of our team members at your nearest retailer, and they’ll talk you through the process and before you know it, you could be holding your very own house keys in your hand.


Once I purchase a TRU Home, how long will it be until I can move in?

This will depend on a few factors, and timing can range from 3-4 or more weeks:

  1. Whether the home you purchase is in-stock or not (your home retailer should tell you this)
  2. How far your new home site / land is from the home building facility where your home is or is being made
  3. Whether the proper paperwork is in place regarding your land (you’ll need a deed of ownership plus to acquire building permits before your TRU Home can be installed — more about this here.) and if you’re financing your home purchase, whether you have already been approved for a loan from the lender of your choice.

Contact your local home center for more information on average delivery timeframes for your specific home.


Why should I invest in homeownership instead of renting?

When you rent a place to live, every monthly payment is money that’s gone from your pocket—forever. Owning a home, on the other hand, is an investment. Every monthly payment you make is less money you owe on your home, meaning should you choose to sell your home, you’ll ideally make a profit. Proper home care and maintenance as well as home location and general market tendencies do play into whether or not your home will appreciate in value from the time you purchase it, however, at the very least, it’s an investment that can be passed along to friends and family for years to come once your loan is paid in full. On top of that, you have the freedom to live however you want in your own home—if you own your own land you might plant a garden, enjoy the company of a pet and turn the music up as loud as you want without worrying about the rules that can come along with renting. Nice thought, isn’t it?


Will I be safe in a TRU Home if there’s a tornado?

Great question. While the news perpetuates stories of mobile homes being unsafe during severe weather events, the truth is, manufactured homes (What’s the difference? Read more under question 1, above) are made to withstand strong winds, and in some cases, are safer than site-built homes that are not subject to the same building rules and regulations. More on this topic:

“ARLINGTON, Va., Aug. 30, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Manufactured homes are as safe as traditional homes during a storm, and in hurricane zones, the standards for manufactured homes are more stringent than regional and national building codes for site-built homes. The Manufactured Housing Institute (MHI), the national trade association for the factory-built housing industry, is working to clear up the negative stereotypes about manufactured homes and inform the public that since 1976 they have been built to rigorous federal standards.

The standards for manufactured housing are subject to robust compliance and quality assurance regulations, sometimes more stringent than those for traditional site-built homes,” says Richard Jennison, President and CEO of MHI.  “The building materials in today’s manufactured home are the same as those used in site-built homes. The homes are engineered for wind safety based on the geographic region in which they are sold.

The federal Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards (better known as the HUD Code) are a stringent series of construction and safety standards and regulations that ensure that manufactured homes are superior to mobile homes. The name “mobile homes” refers to homes built before 1976, when the HUD code was implemented. Since then they have been called manufactured homes, constructed in a controlled factory environment and built to the HUD Code. These federal standards regulate manufactured housing design and construction, strength and durability, transportability, fire resistance, energy efficiency and quality.

In 1994, HUD revised and increased its wind safety standards after Hurricane Andrew stuck 1992. The result was that during the hurricanes that struck Florida in 2004, not one manufactured home built and installed after 1994 was destroyed by hurricane force winds.”1

1. “Manufactured Homes are as Safe as Traditional Homes During a Storm”, https://globenewswire.com/news-release/2016/08/30/868126/0/en/Manufactured-Homes-are-as-Safe-as-Traditional-Homes-During-a-Storm.html